Cressi Leonardo vs Giotto: A Few Key Differences

Cressi Leonardo, black/grey
Cressi Giotto Wrist Computer, Black/White

Gone are the days of having to wear a dive watch like a Seiko Pepsi when you are underwater. Sure, these kinds of watches did a great job of showing you the time and remaining dive time if you were diving or snorkelling, but that is about all they could do.

These days, it is companies like Suunto in the outdoor market and Cressi in the diving market that are leading the way in modern digital watches that are super-useful in their respective markets.

That is why I am going to compare two of Cressi’s best dive watches in this review – to show you how they compare and what differences you have to watch out for (no pun intended :>).

But first, let’s take a close look at the specs where you can see all the common features these watches share (99% of them actually).

Cressi Leonardo, black/grey
Cressi Giotto Wrist Computer, Black/White
Watch Mode (Out of water)
Time, day, date
Time, day, date
Dive Mode
Air/Nitrox
21%-50% O2 with 1% increments
21%-50% O2 with 1% increments
2 Interchangeable Mixes During Dive
Logbook
75 dives or 60 diving hours with 16 pieces of information about each dive
75 dives or 60 diving hours with 16 pieces of information about each dive
Adjustable PO2
1.0-1.6
1.0-1.6
Safety Level Algorithm
Safety factor: SF0, SF1, SF2
Safety factor: SF0, SF1, SF2
Dive Planning Mode
Variable Ascent
Acoustic and visual alarms
PO2, CNS, ascent rate, DECO, DECO bypass
PO2, CNS, ascent rate, DECO, DECO bypass
Gauge Mode
Separate Log Book
Stopwatch
Depth & Max Depth, Temp, Dive Time Reading
Battery Life
3 years (50 dives per year)
3 years (50 dives per year)
Reset Option
Backlit Screen
Cressi Leonardo, black/grey
Watch Mode (Out of water)
Time, day, date
Dive Mode
Air/Nitrox
21%-50% O2 with 1% increments
2 Interchangeable Mixes During Dive
Logbook
75 dives or 60 diving hours with 16 pieces of information about each dive
Adjustable PO2
1.0-1.6
Safety Level Algorithm
Safety factor: SF0, SF1, SF2
Dive Planning Mode
Variable Ascent
Acoustic and visual alarms
PO2, CNS, ascent rate, DECO, DECO bypass
Gauge Mode
Separate Log Book
Stopwatch
Depth & Max Depth, Temp, Dive Time Reading
Battery Life
3 years (50 dives per year)
Reset Option
Backlit Screen
Cressi Giotto Wrist Computer, Black/White
Watch Mode (Out of water)
Time, day, date
Dive Mode
Air/Nitrox
21%-50% O2 with 1% increments
2 Interchangeable Mixes During Dive
Logbook
75 dives or 60 diving hours with 16 pieces of information about each dive
Adjustable PO2
1.0-1.6
Safety Level Algorithm
Safety factor: SF0, SF1, SF2
Dive Planning Mode
Variable Ascent
Acoustic and visual alarms
PO2, CNS, ascent rate, DECO, DECO bypass
Gauge Mode
Separate Log Book
Stopwatch
Depth & Max Depth, Temp, Dive Time Reading
Battery Life
3 years (50 dives per year)
Reset Option
Backlit Screen

The Differences Between The Leonardo & Giotto

These two watches are actually almost identical. The Leonardo has 99% of the features of the Giotto except for a couple of key elements.

Change Of Air Mix

The first, is something that will likely only be of interest to pro divers and that is the ability to change air mixes during a dive.

Of course, some recreational divers might also find this feature to be handy, but most people won’t need this.

The Buttons & Usability

More important to most of us is the usability of the watch. There is nothing more annoying with a digital watch/computer than having to mess around with a button to get to the settings / features you want, especially when you are under water.

The Giotto has improved on the original design of the Leonardo and uses a three button interface instead of the single button in the Leonardo. So, if you intend on diving more often or messing with your settings a lot, then this is a big one. The Giotto wins hands down on this.

The Colors

I am leaving perhaps the least important of all until last. The color selection.
 
These two models do have different colors available, so it’s worth noting, if that is important to you.
 
The Leonardo: Black/Black, Black/Blue, Black/Camo, Black/Gray, Black/Orange, Black/Red, Black/Pink, Black/Yellow, Black/High Visibility Green
Also: All Blue, White/Pink, White/Lilac
 
The Giotto: Black/Black, Black/Blue (Also White Face Available), Black/White, Black/Gray, Black/Red, Black/Pink, Black/Yellow, Black/High Visibility Green
Also: White/Lilac

Which Should You Choose

The choice with these two dive computer watches basically comes down to two things:

Money and features.

If you just want an impressively feature-rich dive computer, but don’t need the gas-mix change feature, you can save about one hundred dollars by just grabbing the Leonardo.

However, you will have to deal with the single button interface. It’s up to you to decide if you are the patient type, or will get annoyed by that :>